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CONFIG_FAT_FS: DOS FAT fs support

General informations

The Linux kernel configuration item CONFIG_FAT_FS has multiple definitions:

found in fs/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_FAT_FS:

Help text

If you want to use one of the FAT-based file systems (the MS-DOS and VFAT (Windows 95) file systems), then you must say Y or M here to include FAT support. You will then be able to mount partitions or diskettes with FAT-based file systems and transparently access the files on them, i.e. MSDOS files will look and behave just like all other Unix files.

This FAT support is not a file system in itself, it only provides the foundation for the other file systems. You will have to say Y or M to at least one of "MSDOS fs support" or "VFAT fs support" in order to make use of it.

Another way to read and write MSDOS floppies and hard drive partitions from within Linux (but not transparently) is with the mtools ("man mtools") program suite. You don't need to say Y here in order to do that.

If you need to move large files on floppies between a DOS and a Linux box, say Y here, mount the floppy under Linux with an MSDOS file system and use GNU tar's M option. GNU tar is a program available for Unix and DOS ("man tar" or "info tar").

The FAT support will enlarge your kernel by about 37 KB. If unsure, say Y.

To compile this as a module, choose M here: the module will be called fat. Note that if you compile the FAT support as a module, you cannot compile any of the FAT-based file systems into the kernel -- they will have to be modules as well.

found in fs/fat/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_FAT_FS:

Help text

If you want to use one of the FAT-based file systems (the MS-DOS and VFAT (Windows 95) file systems), then you must say Y or M here to include FAT support. You will then be able to mount partitions or diskettes with FAT-based file systems and transparently access the files on them, i.e. MSDOS files will look and behave just like all other Unix files.

This FAT support is not a file system in itself, it only provides the foundation for the other file systems. You will have to say Y or M to at least one of "MSDOS fs support" or "VFAT fs support" in order to make use of it.

Another way to read and write MSDOS floppies and hard drive partitions from within Linux (but not transparently) is with the mtools ("man mtools") program suite. You don't need to say Y here in order to do that.

If you need to move large files on floppies between a DOS and a Linux box, say Y here, mount the floppy under Linux with an MSDOS file system and use GNU tar's M option. GNU tar is a program available for Unix and DOS ("man tar" or "info tar").

The FAT support will enlarge your kernel by about 37 KB. If unsure, say Y.

To compile this as a module, choose M here: the module will be called fat. Note that if you compile the FAT support as a module, you cannot compile any of the FAT-based file systems into the kernel -- they will have to be modules as well.

DOS FAT fs support found in fs/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_FAT_FS:

Help text

If you want to use one of the FAT-based file systems (the MS-DOS, VFAT (Windows 95) and UMSDOS (used to run Linux on top of an ordinary DOS partition) file systems), then you must say Y or M here to include FAT support. You will then be able to mount partitions or diskettes with FAT-based file systems and transparently access the files on them, i.e. MSDOS files will look and behave just like all other Unix files.

This FAT support is not a file system in itself, it only provides the foundation for the other file systems. You will have to say Y or M to at least one of "MSDOS fs support" or "VFAT fs support" in order to make use of it.

Another way to read and write MSDOS floppies and hard drive partitions from within Linux (but not transparently) is with the mtools ("man mtools") program suite. You don't need to say Y here in order to do that.

If you need to move large files on floppies between a DOS and a Linux box, say Y here, mount the floppy under Linux with an MSDOS file system and use GNU tar's M option. GNU tar is a program available for Unix and DOS ("man tar" or "info tar").

It is now also becoming possible to read and write compressed FAT file systems; read Documentation/filesystems/fat_cvf.txt for details.

The FAT support will enlarge your kernel by about 37 KB. If unsure, say Y.

To compile this as a module, choose M here: the module will be called fat. Note that if you compile the FAT support as a module, you cannot compile any of the FAT-based file systems into the kernel -- they will have to be modules as well. The file system of your root partition (the one containing the directory /) cannot be a module, so don't say M here if you intend to use UMSDOS as your root file system.

Hardware

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