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CONFIG_HOTPLUG: Support for hot-pluggable devices

General informations

The Linux kernel configuration item CONFIG_HOTPLUG has multiple definitions:

found in drivers/s390/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_HOTPLUG:

Help text

Say Y here if you want to plug devices into your computer while the system is running, and be able to use them quickly. In many cases, the devices can likewise be unplugged at any time too.

One well known example of this is PCMCIA- or PC-cards, credit-card size devices such as network cards, modems or hard drives which are plugged into slots found on all modern laptop computers. Another example, used on modern desktops as well as laptops, is USB.

Enable HOTPLUG and KMOD, and build a modular kernel. Get agent software (at http://linux-hotplug.sourceforge.net/) and install it. Then your kernel will automatically call out to a user mode "policy agent" (/sbin/hotplug) to load modules and set up software needed to use devices as you hotplug them.

found in init/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_HOTPLUG:

Help text

(none)

Support for hot-pluggable device found in arch/blackfin/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_HOTPLUG:

Help text

Say Y here if you want to plug devices into your computer while the system is running, and be able to use them quickly. In many cases, the devices can likewise be unplugged at any time too.

One well known example of this is PCMCIA- or PC-cards, credit-card size devices such as network cards, modems or hard drives which are plugged into slots found on all modern laptop computers. Another example, used on modern desktops as well as laptops, is USB.

Enable HOTPLUG and build a modular kernel. Get agent software (from http://linux-hotplug.sourceforge.net/) and install it. Then your kernel will automatically call out to a user mode "policy agent" (/sbin/hotplug) to load modules and set up software needed to use devices as you hotplug them.

Support for hot-pluggable device found in arch/m68knommu/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_HOTPLUG:

Help text

Say Y here if you want to plug devices into your computer while the system is running, and be able to use them quickly. In many cases, the devices can likewise be unplugged at any time too.

One well known example of this is PCMCIA- or PC-cards, credit-card size devices such as network cards, modems or hard drives which are plugged into slots found on all modern laptop computers. Another example, used on modern desktops as well as laptops, is USB.

Enable HOTPLUG and KMOD, and build a modular kernel. Get agent software (at http://linux-hotplug.sourceforge.net/) and install it. Then your kernel will automatically call out to a user mode "policy agent" (/sbin/hotplug) to load modules and set up software needed to use devices as you hotplug them.

Support for hot-pluggable device found in arch/v850/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_HOTPLUG:

Help text

Say Y here if you want to plug devices into your computer while the system is running, and be able to use them quickly. In many cases, the devices can likewise be unplugged at any time too.

One well known example of this is PCMCIA- or PC-cards, credit-card size devices such as network cards, modems or hard drives which are plugged into slots found on all modern laptop computers. Another example, used on modern desktops as well as laptops, is USB.

Enable HOTPLUG and KMOD, and build a modular kernel. Get agent software (at http://linux-hotplug.sourceforge.net/) and install it. Then your kernel will automatically call out to a user mode "policy agent" (/sbin/hotplug) to load modules and set up software needed to use devices as you hotplug them.

Support for hot-pluggable devices found in arch/alpha/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_HOTPLUG:

Help text

Say Y here if you want to plug devices into your computer while the system is running, and be able to use them quickly. In many cases, the devices can likewise be unplugged at any time too.

One well known example of this is PCMCIA- or PC-cards, credit-card size devices such as network cards, modems or hard drives which are plugged into slots found on all modern laptop computers. Another example, used on modern desktops as well as laptops, is USB.

Enable HOTPLUG and KMOD, and build a modular kernel. Get agent software (at http://linux-hotplug.sourceforge.net/) and install it. Then your kernel will automatically call out to a user mode "policy agent" (/sbin/hotplug) to load modules and set up software needed to use devices as you hotplug them.

Support for hot-pluggable devices found in arch/arm/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_HOTPLUG:

Help text

Say Y here if you want to plug devices into your computer while the system is running, and be able to use them quickly. In many cases, the devices can likewise be unplugged at any time too.

One well known example of this is PCMCIA- or PC-cards, credit-card size devices such as network cards, modems or hard drives which are plugged into slots found on all modern laptop computers. Another example, used on modern desktops as well as laptops, is USB.

Enable HOTPLUG and KMOD, and build a modular kernel. Get agent software (at http://linux-hotplug.sourceforge.net/) and install it. Then your kernel will automatically call out to a user mode "policy agent" (/sbin/hotplug) to load modules and set up software needed to use devices as you hotplug them.

Support for hot-pluggable devices found in arch/arm26/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_HOTPLUG:

Help text

Say Y here if you want to plug devices into your computer while the system is running, and be able to use them quickly. In many cases, the devices can likewise be unplugged at any time too.

One well known example of this is PCMCIA- or PC-cards, credit-card size devices such as network cards, modems or hard drives which are plugged into slots found on all modern laptop computers. Another example, used on modern desktops as well as laptops, is USB.

Enable HOTPLUG and KMOD, and build a modular kernel. Get agent software (at http://linux-hotplug.sourceforge.net/) and install it. Then your kernel will automatically call out to a user mode "policy agent" (/sbin/hotplug) to load modules and set up software needed to use devices as you hotplug them.

Support for hot-pluggable devices found in arch/i386/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_HOTPLUG:

Help text

Say Y here if you want to plug devices into your computer while the system is running, and be able to use them quickly. In many cases, the devices can likewise be unplugged at any time too.

One well known example of this is PCMCIA- or PC-cards, credit-card size devices such as network cards, modems or hard drives which are plugged into slots found on all modern laptop computers. Another example, used on modern desktops as well as laptops, is USB.

Enable HOTPLUG and KMOD, and build a modular kernel. Get agent software (at http://linux-hotplug.sourceforge.net/) and install it. Then your kernel will automatically call out to a user mode "policy agent" (/sbin/hotplug) to load modules and set up software needed to use devices as you hotplug them.

Support for hot-pluggable devices found in arch/ia64/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_HOTPLUG:

Help text

Say Y here if you want to plug devices into your computer while the system is running, and be able to use them quickly. In many cases, the devices can likewise be unplugged at any time too.

One well known example of this is PCMCIA- or PC-cards, credit-card size devices such as network cards, modems or hard drives which are plugged into slots found on all modern laptop computers. Another example, used on modern desktops as well as laptops, is USB.

Enable HOTPLUG and KMOD, and build a modular kernel. Get agent software (at http://linux-hotplug.sourceforge.net/) and install it. Then your kernel will automatically call out to a user mode "policy agent" (/sbin/hotplug) to load modules and set up software needed to use devices as you hotplug them.

Support for hot-pluggable devices found in arch/mips/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_HOTPLUG:

Help text

Say Y here if you want to plug devices into your computer while the system is running, and be able to use them quickly. In many cases, the devices can likewise be unplugged at any time too.

One well known example of this is PCMCIA- or PC-cards, credit-card size devices such as network cards, modems or hard drives which are plugged into slots found on all modern laptop computers. Another example, used on modern desktops as well as laptops, is USB.

Enable HOTPLUG and KMOD, and build a modular kernel. Get agent software (at http://linux-hotplug.sourceforge.net/) and install it. Then your kernel will automatically call out to a user mode "policy agent" (/sbin/hotplug) to load modules and set up software needed to use devices as you hotplug them.

Support for hot-pluggable devices found in arch/ppc/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_HOTPLUG:

Help text

Say Y here if you want to plug devices into your computer while the system is running, and be able to use them quickly. In many cases, the devices can likewise be unplugged at any time too.

One well known example of this is PCMCIA- or PC-cards, credit-card size devices such as network cards, modems or hard drives which are plugged into slots found on all modern laptop computers. Another example, used on modern desktops as well as laptops, is USB.

Enable HOTPLUG and KMOD, and build a modular kernel. Get agent software (at http://linux-hotplug.sourceforge.net/) and install it. Then your kernel will automatically call out to a user mode "policy agent" (/sbin/hotplug) to load modules and set up software needed to use devices as you hotplug them.

Support for hot-pluggable devices found in arch/ppc64/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_HOTPLUG:

Help text

Say Y here if you want to plug devices into your computer while the system is running, and be able to use them quickly. In many cases, the devices can likewise be unplugged at any time too.

One well known example of this is PCMCIA- or PC-cards, credit-card size devices such as network cards, modems or hard drives which are plugged into slots found on all modern laptop computers. Another example, used on modern desktops as well as laptops, is USB.

Enable HOTPLUG and KMOD, and build a modular kernel. Get agent software (at http://linux-hotplug.sourceforge.net/) and install it. Then your kernel will automatically call out to a user mode "policy agent" (/sbin/hotplug) to load modules and set up software needed to use devices as you hotplug them.

Support for hot-pluggable devices found in arch/sh/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_HOTPLUG:

Help text

Say Y here if you want to plug devices into your computer while the system is running, and be able to use them quickly. In many cases, the devices can likewise be unplugged at any time too.

One well known example of this is PCMCIA- or PC-cards, credit-card size devices such as network cards, modems or hard drives which are plugged into slots found on all modern laptop computers. Another example, used on modern desktops as well as laptops, is USB.

Enable HOTPLUG and KMOD, and build a modular kernel. Get agent software (at http://linux-hotplug.sourceforge.net/) and install it. Then your kernel will automatically call out to a user mode "policy agent" (/sbin/hotplug) to load modules and set up software needed to use devices as you hotplug them.

Support for hot-pluggable devices found in arch/sparc64/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_HOTPLUG:

Help text

Say Y here if you want to plug devices into your computer while the system is running, and be able to use them quickly. In many cases, the devices can likewise be unplugged at any time too.

One well known example of this is PCMCIA- or PC-cards, credit-card size devices such as network cards, modems or hard drives which are plugged into slots found on all modern laptop computers. Another example, used on modern desktops as well as laptops, is USB.

Enable HOTPLUG and KMOD, and build a modular kernel. Get agent software (at http://linux-hotplug.sourceforge.net/) and install it. Then your kernel will automatically call out to a user mode "policy agent" (/sbin/hotplug) to load modules and set up software needed to use devices as you hotplug them.

Support for hot-pluggable devices found in arch/tile/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_HOTPLUG:

Help text

Say Y here if you want to plug devices into your computer while the system is running, and be able to use them quickly. In many cases, the devices can likewise be unplugged at any time too. One well-known example of this is USB.

Support for hot-pluggable devices found in arch/x86_64/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_HOTPLUG:

Help text

Say Y here if you want to plug devices into your computer while the system is running, and be able to use them quickly. In many cases, the devices can likewise be unplugged at any time too.

One well-known example of this is PCMCIA- or PC-cards, credit-card size devices such as network cards, modems, or hard drives which are plugged into slots found on all modern laptop computers. Another example, used on modern desktops as well as laptops, is USB.

Enable HOTPLUG and KMOD, and build a modular kernel. Get agent software (at http://linux-hotplug.sourceforge.net/) and install it. Then your kernel will automatically call out to a user mode "policy agent" (/sbin/hotplug) to load modules and set up software needed to use devices as you hotplug them.

Support for hot-pluggable devices found in arch/xtensa/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_HOTPLUG:

Help text

Say Y here if you want to plug devices into your computer while the system is running, and be able to use them quickly. In many cases, the devices can likewise be unplugged at any time too.

One well known example of this is PCMCIA- or PC-cards, credit-card size devices such as network cards, modems or hard drives which are plugged into slots found on all modern laptop computers. Another example, used on modern desktops as well as laptops, is USB.

Enable HOTPLUG and build a modular kernel. Get agent software (from http://linux-hotplug.sourceforge.net/) and install it. Then your kernel will automatically call out to a user mode "policy agent" (/sbin/hotplug) to load modules and set up software needed to use devices as you hotplug them.

Support for hot-pluggable devices found in drivers/parisc/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_HOTPLUG:

Help text

Say Y here if you want to plug devices into your computer while the system is running, and be able to use them quickly. In many cases, the devices can likewise be unplugged at any time too.

One well known example of this is PCMCIA- or PC-cards, credit-card size devices such as network cards, modems or hard drives which are plugged into slots found on all modern laptop computers. Another example, used on modern desktops as well as laptops, is USB.

Enable HOTPLUG and KMOD, and build a modular kernel. Get agent software (at http://linux-hotplug.sourceforge.net/) and install it. Then your kernel will automatically call out to a user mode "policy agent" (/sbin/hotplug) to load modules and set up software needed to use devices as you hotplug them.

Support for hot-pluggable devices found in init/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_HOTPLUG:

Help text

This option is provided for the case where no hotplug or uevent capabilities is wanted by the kernel. You should only consider disabling this option for embedded systems that do not use modules, a dynamic /dev tree, or dynamic device discovery. Just say Y.

Hardware

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