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CONFIG_SECCOMP: Enable seccomp to safely compute untrusted bytecode

General informations

The Linux kernel configuration item CONFIG_SECCOMP has multiple definitions:

Enable seccomp to safely compute untrusted bytecode found in arch/arm/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_SECCOMP:

Help text

This kernel feature is useful for number crunching applications that may need to compute untrusted bytecode during their execution. By using pipes or other transports made available to the process as file descriptors supporting the read/write syscalls, it's possible to isolate those applications in their own address space using seccomp. Once seccomp is enabled via prctl(PR_SET_SECCOMP), it cannot be disabled and the task is only allowed to execute a few safe syscalls defined by each seccomp mode.

Enable seccomp to safely compute untrusted bytecode found in arch/arm64/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_SECCOMP:

Help text

This kernel feature is useful for number crunching applications that may need to compute untrusted bytecode during their execution. By using pipes or other transports made available to the process as file descriptors supporting the read/write syscalls, it's possible to isolate those applications in their own address space using seccomp. Once seccomp is enabled via prctl(PR_SET_SECCOMP), it cannot be disabled and the task is only allowed to execute a few safe syscalls defined by each seccomp mode.

Enable seccomp to safely compute untrusted bytecode found in arch/i386/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_SECCOMP:

Help text

This kernel feature is useful for number crunching applications that may need to compute untrusted bytecode during their execution. By using pipes or other transports made available to the process as file descriptors supporting the read/write syscalls, it's possible to isolate those applications in their own address space using seccomp. Once seccomp is enabled via /proc/<pid>/seccomp, it cannot be disabled and the task is only allowed to execute a few safe syscalls defined by each seccomp mode.

If unsure, say Y. Only embedded should say N here.

Enable seccomp to safely compute untrusted bytecode found in arch/microblaze/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_SECCOMP:

Help text

This kernel feature is useful for number crunching applications that may need to compute untrusted bytecode during their execution. By using pipes or other transports made available to the process as file descriptors supporting the read/write syscalls, it's possible to isolate those applications in their own address space using seccomp. Once seccomp is enabled via /proc/<pid>/seccomp, it cannot be disabled and the task is only allowed to execute a few safe syscalls defined by each seccomp mode.

If unsure, say Y. Only embedded should say N here.

Enable seccomp to safely compute untrusted bytecode found in arch/mips/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_SECCOMP:

Help text

This kernel feature is useful for number crunching applications that may need to compute untrusted bytecode during their execution. By using pipes or other transports made available to the process as file descriptors supporting the read/write syscalls, it's possible to isolate those applications in their own address space using seccomp. Once seccomp is enabled via /proc/<pid>/seccomp, it cannot be disabled and the task is only allowed to execute a few safe syscalls defined by each seccomp mode.

If unsure, say Y. Only embedded should say N here.

Enable seccomp to safely compute untrusted bytecode found in arch/parisc/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_SECCOMP:

Help text

This kernel feature is useful for number crunching applications that may need to compute untrusted bytecode during their execution. By using pipes or other transports made available to the process as file descriptors supporting the read/write syscalls, it's possible to isolate those applications in their own address space using seccomp. Once seccomp is enabled via prctl(PR_SET_SECCOMP), it cannot be disabled and the task is only allowed to execute a few safe syscalls defined by each seccomp mode.

If unsure, say Y. Only embedded should say N here.

Enable seccomp to safely compute untrusted bytecode found in arch/powerpc/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_SECCOMP:

Help text

This kernel feature is useful for number crunching applications that may need to compute untrusted bytecode during their execution. By using pipes or other transports made available to the process as file descriptors supporting the read/write syscalls, it's possible to isolate those applications in their own address space using seccomp. Once seccomp is enabled via /proc/<pid>/seccomp, it cannot be disabled and the task is only allowed to execute a few safe syscalls defined by each seccomp mode.

If unsure, say Y. Only embedded should say N here.

Enable seccomp to safely compute untrusted bytecode found in arch/ppc/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_SECCOMP:

Help text

This kernel feature is useful for number crunching applications that may need to compute untrusted bytecode during their execution. By using pipes or other transports made available to the process as file descriptors supporting the read/write syscalls, it's possible to isolate those applications in their own address space using seccomp. Once seccomp is enabled via /proc/<pid>/seccomp, it cannot be disabled and the task is only allowed to execute a few safe syscalls defined by each seccomp mode.

If unsure, say Y. Only embedded should say N here.

Enable seccomp to safely compute untrusted bytecode found in arch/ppc64/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_SECCOMP:

Help text

This kernel feature is useful for number crunching applications that may need to compute untrusted bytecode during their execution. By using pipes or other transports made available to the process as file descriptors supporting the read/write syscalls, it's possible to isolate those applications in their own address space using seccomp. Once seccomp is enabled via /proc/<pid>/seccomp, it cannot be disabled and the task is only allowed to execute a few safe syscalls defined by each seccomp mode.

If unsure, say Y. Only embedded should say N here.

Enable seccomp to safely compute untrusted bytecode found in arch/s390/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_SECCOMP:

Help text

This kernel feature is useful for number crunching applications that may need to compute untrusted bytecode during their execution. By using pipes or other transports made available to the process as file descriptors supporting the read/write syscalls, it's possible to isolate those applications in their own address space using seccomp. Once seccomp is enabled via /proc/<pid>/seccomp, it cannot be disabled and the task is only allowed to execute a few safe syscalls defined by each seccomp mode.

If unsure, say Y.

Enable seccomp to safely compute untrusted bytecode found in arch/sh/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_SECCOMP:

Help text

This kernel feature is useful for number crunching applications that may need to compute untrusted bytecode during their execution. By using pipes or other transports made available to the process as file descriptors supporting the read/write syscalls, it's possible to isolate those applications in their own address space using seccomp. Once seccomp is enabled via prctl, it cannot be disabled and the task is only allowed to execute a few safe syscalls defined by each seccomp mode.

If unsure, say N.

Enable seccomp to safely compute untrusted bytecode found in arch/sparc/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_SECCOMP:

Help text

This kernel feature is useful for number crunching applications that may need to compute untrusted bytecode during their execution. By using pipes or other transports made available to the process as file descriptors supporting the read/write syscalls, it's possible to isolate those applications in their own address space using seccomp. Once seccomp is enabled via /proc/<pid>/seccomp, it cannot be disabled and the task is only allowed to execute a few safe syscalls defined by each seccomp mode.

If unsure, say Y. Only embedded should say N here.

Enable seccomp to safely compute untrusted bytecode found in arch/sparc64/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_SECCOMP:

Help text

This kernel feature is useful for number crunching applications that may need to compute untrusted bytecode during their execution. By using pipes or other transports made available to the process as file descriptors supporting the read/write syscalls, it's possible to isolate those applications in their own address space using seccomp. Once seccomp is enabled via /proc/<pid>/seccomp, it cannot be disabled and the task is only allowed to execute a few safe syscalls defined by each seccomp mode.

If unsure, say Y. Only embedded should say N here.

Enable seccomp to safely compute untrusted bytecode found in arch/x86/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_SECCOMP:

Help text

This kernel feature is useful for number crunching applications that may need to compute untrusted bytecode during their execution. By using pipes or other transports made available to the process as file descriptors supporting the read/write syscalls, it's possible to isolate those applications in their own address space using seccomp. Once seccomp is enabled via prctl(PR_SET_SECCOMP), it cannot be disabled and the task is only allowed to execute a few safe syscalls defined by each seccomp mode.

If unsure, say Y. Only embedded should say N here.

Enable seccomp to safely compute untrusted bytecode found in arch/x86_64/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_SECCOMP:

Help text

This kernel feature is useful for number crunching applications that may need to compute untrusted bytecode during their execution. By using pipes or other transports made available to the process as file descriptors supporting the read/write syscalls, it's possible to isolate those applications in their own address space using seccomp. Once seccomp is enabled via /proc/<pid>/seccomp, it cannot be disabled and the task is only allowed to execute a few safe syscalls defined by each seccomp mode.

If unsure, say Y. Only embedded should say N here.

Hardware

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