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CONFIG_SLIP: SLIP (serial line) support

General informations

The Linux kernel configuration item CONFIG_SLIP has multiple definitions:

SLIP (serial line) support found in arch/um/Kconfig_net

The configuration item CONFIG_SLIP:

Help text

(none)

SLIP (serial line) support found in drivers/net/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_SLIP:

Help text

Say Y if you intend to use SLIP or CSLIP (compressed SLIP) to connect to your Internet service provider or to connect to some other local Unix box or if you want to configure your Linux box as a Slip/CSlip server for other people to dial in. SLIP (Serial Line Internet Protocol) is a protocol used to send Internet traffic over serial connections such as telephone lines or null modem cables; nowadays, the protocol PPP is more commonly used for this same purpose.

Normally, your access provider has to support SLIP in order for you to be able to use it, but there is now a SLIP emulator called SLiRP around (available from <ftp://ibiblio.org/pub/Linux/system/network/serial/>) which allows you to use SLIP over a regular dial up shell connection. If you plan to use SLiRP, make sure to say Y to CSLIP, below. The NET-3-HOWTO, available from http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto, explains how to configure SLIP. Note that you don't need this option if you just want to run term (term is a program which gives you almost full Internet connectivity if you have a regular dial up shell account on some Internet connected Unix computer. Read http://www.bart.nl/~patrickr/term-howto/Term-HOWTO.html). SLIP support will enlarge your kernel by about 4 KB. If unsure, say N.

To compile this driver as a module, choose M here. The module will be called slip.

SLIP (serial line) support found in drivers/net/slip/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_SLIP:

Help text

Say Y if you intend to use SLIP or CSLIP (compressed SLIP) to connect to your Internet service provider or to connect to some other local Unix box or if you want to configure your Linux box as a Slip/CSlip server for other people to dial in. SLIP (Serial Line Internet Protocol) is a protocol used to send Internet traffic over serial connections such as telephone lines or null modem cables; nowadays, the protocol PPP is more commonly used for this same purpose.

Normally, your access provider has to support SLIP in order for you to be able to use it, but there is now a SLIP emulator called SLiRP around (available from <ftp://ibiblio.org/pub/Linux/system/network/serial/>) which allows you to use SLIP over a regular dial up shell connection. If you plan to use SLiRP, make sure to say Y to CSLIP, below. The NET-3-HOWTO, available from http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto, explains how to configure SLIP. Note that you don't need this option if you just want to run term (term is a program which gives you almost full Internet connectivity if you have a regular dial up shell account on some Internet connected Unix computer. Read http://www.bart.nl/~patrickr/term-howto/Term-HOWTO.html). SLIP support will enlarge your kernel by about 4 KB. If unsure, say N.

To compile this driver as a module, choose M here. The module will be called slip.

Hardware

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