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CONFIG_SMB_FS: SMB file system support (OBSOLETE, please use CIFS)

General informations

The Linux kernel configuration item CONFIG_SMB_FS has multiple definitions:

SMB file system support (OBSOLETE, please use CIFS) found in drivers/staging/smbfs/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_SMB_FS:

Help text

SMB (Server Message Block) is the protocol Windows for Workgroups (WfW), Windows 95/98, Windows NT and OS/2 Lan Manager use to share files and printers over local networks. Saying Y here allows you to mount their file systems (often called "shares" in this context) and access them just like any other Unix directory. Currently, this works only if the Windows machines use TCP/IP as the underlying transport protocol, and not NetBEUI. For details, read Documentation/filesystems/smbfs.txt and the SMB-HOWTO, available from http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto.

Note: if you just want your box to act as an SMB *server* and make files and printing services available to Windows clients (which need to have a TCP/IP stack), you don't need to say Y here; you can use the program SAMBA (available from <ftp://ftp.samba.org/pub/samba/>) for that.

General information about how to connect Linux, Windows machines and Macs is on the WWW at http://www.eats.com/linux_mac_win.html.

To compile the SMB support as a module, choose M here: the module will be called smbfs. Most people say N, however.

SMB file system support (OBSOLETE, please use CIFS) found in fs/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_SMB_FS:

Help text

SMB (Server Message Block) is the protocol Windows for Workgroups (WfW), Windows 95/98, Windows NT and OS/2 Lan Manager use to share files and printers over local networks. Saying Y here allows you to mount their file systems (often called "shares" in this context) and access them just like any other Unix directory. Currently, this works only if the Windows machines use TCP/IP as the underlying transport protocol, and not NetBEUI. For details, read Documentation/filesystems/smbfs.txt and the SMB-HOWTO, available from http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto.

Note: if you just want your box to act as an SMB *server* and make files and printing services available to Windows clients (which need to have a TCP/IP stack), you don't need to say Y here; you can use the program SAMBA (available from <ftp://ftp.samba.org/pub/samba/>) for that.

General information about how to connect Linux, Windows machines and Macs is on the WWW at http://www.eats.com/linux_mac_win.html.

To compile the SMB support as a module, choose M here: the module will be called smbfs. Most people say N, however.

SMB file system support (OBSOLETE, please use CIFS) found in fs/smbfs/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_SMB_FS:

Help text

SMB (Server Message Block) is the protocol Windows for Workgroups (WfW), Windows 95/98, Windows NT and OS/2 Lan Manager use to share files and printers over local networks. Saying Y here allows you to mount their file systems (often called "shares" in this context) and access them just like any other Unix directory. Currently, this works only if the Windows machines use TCP/IP as the underlying transport protocol, and not NetBEUI. For details, read Documentation/filesystems/smbfs.txt and the SMB-HOWTO, available from http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto.

Note: if you just want your box to act as an SMB *server* and make files and printing services available to Windows clients (which need to have a TCP/IP stack), you don't need to say Y here; you can use the program SAMBA (available from <ftp://ftp.samba.org/pub/samba/>) for that.

General information about how to connect Linux, Windows machines and Macs is on the WWW at http://www.eats.com/linux_mac_win.html.

To compile the SMB support as a module, choose M here: the module will be called smbfs. Most people say N, however.

SMB file system support (to mount Windows shares etc.) found in fs/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_SMB_FS:

Help text

SMB (Server Message Block) is the protocol Windows for Workgroups (WfW), Windows 95/98, Windows NT and OS/2 Lan Manager use to share files and printers over local networks. Saying Y here allows you to mount their file systems (often called "shares" in this context) and access them just like any other Unix directory. Currently, this works only if the Windows machines use TCP/IP as the underlying transport protocol, and not NetBEUI. For details, read Documentation/filesystems/smbfs.txt and the SMB-HOWTO, available from http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto.

Note: if you just want your box to act as an SMB *server* and make files and printing services available to Windows clients (which need to have a TCP/IP stack), you don't need to say Y here; you can use the program SAMBA (available from <ftp://ftp.samba.org/pub/samba/>) for that.

General information about how to connect Linux, Windows machines and Macs is on the WWW at http://www.eats.com/linux_mac_win.html.

To compile the SMB support as a module, choose M here: the module will be called smbfs. Most people say N, however.

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