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CONFIG_UML_NET_SLIRP: SLiRP transport

General informations

The Linux kernel configuration item CONFIG_UML_NET_SLIRP has multiple definitions:

SLiRP transport found in arch/um/Kconfig.net

The configuration item CONFIG_UML_NET_SLIRP:

Help text

The SLiRP User-Mode Linux network transport allows a running UML to network by invoking a program that can handle SLIP encapsulated packets. This is commonly (but not limited to) the application known as SLiRP, a program that can re-socket IP packets back onto the host on which it is run. Only IP packets are supported, unlike other network transports that can handle all Ethernet frames. In general, slirp allows the UML the same IP connectivity to the outside world that the host user is permitted, and unlike other transports, SLiRP works without the need of root level privleges, setuid binaries, or SLIP devices on the host. This also means not every type of connection is possible, but most situations can be accommodated with carefully crafted slirp commands that can be passed along as part of the network device's setup string. The effect of this transport on the UML is similar that of a host behind a firewall that masquerades all network connections passing through it (but is less secure).

To use this you should first have slirp compiled somewhere accessible on the host, and have read its documentation. If you don't need UML networking, say N.

Startup example: "eth0=slirp,FE:FD:01:02:03:04,/usr/local/bin/slirp"

SLiRP transport found in arch/um/Kconfig_net

The configuration item CONFIG_UML_NET_SLIRP:

Help text

The SLiRP User-Mode Linux network transport allows a running UML to network by invoking a program that can handle SLIP encapsulated packets. This is commonly (but not limited to) the application known as SLiRP, a program that can re-socket IP packets back onto the host on which it is run. Only IP packets are supported, unlike other network transports that can handle all Ethernet frames. In general, slirp allows the UML the same IP connectivity to the outside world that the host user is permitted, and unlike other transports, SLiRP works without the need of root level privleges, setuid binaries, or SLIP devices on the host. This also means not every type of connection is possible, but most situations can be accomodated with carefully crafted slirp commands that can be passed along as part of the network device's setup string. The effect of this transport on the UML is similar that of a host behind a firewall that masquerades all network connections passing through it (but is less secure).

To use this you should first have slirp compiled somewhere accessible on the host, and have read its documentation. If you don't need UML networking, say N.

Startup example: "eth0=slirp,FE:FD:01:02:03:04,/usr/local/bin/slirp"

Hardware

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