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CONFIG_UNIX98_PTYS: Unix98 PTY support

General informations

The Linux kernel configuration item CONFIG_UNIX98_PTYS has multiple definitions:

Unix98 PTY support found in arch/h8300/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_UNIX98_PTYS:

Help text

A pseudo terminal (PTY) is a software device consisting of two halves: a master and a slave. The slave device behaves identical to a physical terminal; the master device is used by a process to read data from and write data to the slave, thereby emulating a terminal. Typical programs for the master side are telnet servers and xterms.

Linux has traditionally used the BSD-like names /dev/ptyxx for masters and /dev/ttyxx for slaves of pseudo terminals. This scheme has a number of problems. The GNU C library glibc 2.1 and later, however, supports the Unix98 naming standard: in order to acquire a pseudo terminal, a process opens /dev/ptmx; the number of the pseudo terminal is then made available to the process and the pseudo terminal slave can be accessed as /dev/pts/<number>. What was traditionally /dev/ttyp2 will then be /dev/pts/2, for example.

The entries in /dev/pts/ are created on the fly by a virtual file system; therefore, if you say Y here you should say Y to "/dev/pts file system for Unix98 PTYs" as well.

If you want to say Y here, you need to have the C library glibc 2.1 or later (equal to libc-6.1, check with "ls -l /lib/libc.so.*"). Read the instructions in Documentation/Changes pertaining to pseudo terminals. It's safe to say N.

Unix98 PTY support found in arch/m68k/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_UNIX98_PTYS:

Help text

A pseudo terminal (PTY) is a software device consisting of two halves: a master and a slave. The slave device behaves identical to a physical terminal; the master device is used by a process to read data from and write data to the slave, thereby emulating a terminal. Typical programs for the master side are telnet servers and xterms.

Linux has traditionally used the BSD-like names /dev/ptyxx for masters and /dev/ttyxx for slaves of pseudo terminals. This scheme has a number of problems. The GNU C library glibc 2.1 and later, however, supports the Unix98 naming standard: in order to acquire a pseudo terminal, a process opens /dev/ptmx; the number of the pseudo terminal is then made available to the process and the pseudo terminal slave can be accessed as /dev/pts/<number>. What was traditionally /dev/ttyp2 will then be /dev/pts/2, for example.

The entries in /dev/pts/ are created on the fly by a virtual file system; therefore, if you say Y here you should say Y to "/dev/pts file system for Unix98 PTYs" as well.

If you want to say Y here, you need to have the C library glibc 2.1 or later (equal to libc-6.1, check with "ls -l /lib/libc.so.*"). Read the instructions in Documentation/Changes pertaining to pseudo terminals. It's safe to say N.

Unix98 PTY support found in arch/sh/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_UNIX98_PTYS:

Help text

A pseudo terminal (PTY) is a software device consisting of two halves: a master and a slave. The slave device behaves identical to a physical terminal; the master device is used by a process to read data from and write data to the slave, thereby emulating a terminal. Typical programs for the master side are telnet servers and xterms.

Linux has traditionally used the BSD-like names /dev/ptyxx for masters and /dev/ttyxx for slaves of pseudo terminals. This scheme has a number of problems. The GNU C library glibc 2.1 and later, however, supports the Unix98 naming standard: in order to acquire a pseudo terminal, a process opens /dev/ptmx; the number of the pseudo terminal is then made available to the process and the pseudo terminal slave can be accessed as /dev/pts/<number>. What was traditionally /dev/ttyp2 will then be /dev/pts/2, for example.

The entries in /dev/pts/ are created on the fly by a virtual file system; therefore, if you say Y here you should say Y to "/dev/pts file system for Unix98 PTYs" as well.

If you want to say Y here, you need to have the C library glibc 2.1 or later (equal to libc-6.1, check with "ls -l /lib/libc.so.*"). Read the instructions in Documentation/Changes pertaining to pseudo terminals. It's safe to say N.

Unix98 PTY support found in arch/sparc/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_UNIX98_PTYS:

Help text

A pseudo terminal (PTY) is a software device consisting of two halves: a master and a slave. The slave device behaves identical to a physical terminal; the master device is used by a process to read data from and write data to the slave, thereby emulating a terminal. Typical programs for the master side are telnet servers and xterms.

Linux has traditionally used the BSD-like names /dev/ptyxx for masters and /dev/ttyxx for slaves of pseudo terminals. This scheme has a number of problems. The GNU C library glibc 2.1 and later, however, supports the Unix98 naming standard: in order to acquire a pseudo terminal, a process opens /dev/ptmx; the number of the pseudo terminal is then made available to the process and the pseudo terminal slave can be accessed as /dev/pts/<number>. What was traditionally /dev/ttyp2 will then be /dev/pts/2, for example.

The entries in /dev/pts/ are created on the fly by a virtual file system; therefore, if you say Y here you should say Y to "/dev/pts file system for Unix98 PTYs" as well.

If you want to say Y here, you need to have the C library glibc 2.1 or later (equal to libc-6.1, check with "ls -l /lib/libc.so.*"). Read the instructions in Documentation/Changes pertaining to pseudo terminals. It's safe to say N.

Unix98 PTY support found in arch/sparc64/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_UNIX98_PTYS:

Help text

A pseudo terminal (PTY) is a software device consisting of two halves: a master and a slave. The slave device behaves identical to a physical terminal; the master device is used by a process to read data from and write data to the slave, thereby emulating a terminal. Typical programs for the master side are telnet servers and xterms.

Linux has traditionally used the BSD-like names /dev/ptyxx for masters and /dev/ttyxx for slaves of pseudo terminals. This scheme has a number of problems. The GNU C library glibc 2.1 and later, however, supports the Unix98 naming standard: in order to acquire a pseudo terminal, a process opens /dev/ptmx; the number of the pseudo terminal is then made available to the process and the pseudo terminal slave can be accessed as /dev/pts/<number>. What was traditionally /dev/ttyp2 will then be /dev/pts/2, for example.

The entries in /dev/pts/ are created on the fly by a virtual file system; therefore, if you say Y here you should say Y to "/dev/pts file system for Unix98 PTYs" as well.

If you want to say Y here, you need to have the C library glibc 2.1 or later (equal to libc-6.1, check with "ls -l /lib/libc.so.*"). Read the instructions in Documentation/Changes pertaining to pseudo terminals. It's safe to say N.

Unix98 PTY support found in arch/um/Kconfig.char

The configuration item CONFIG_UNIX98_PTYS:

Help text

A pseudo terminal (PTY) is a software device consisting of two halves: a master and a slave. The slave device behaves identical to a physical terminal; the master device is used by a process to read data from and write data to the slave, thereby emulating a terminal. Typical programs for the master side are telnet servers and xterms.

Linux has traditionally used the BSD-like names /dev/ptyxx for masters and /dev/ttyxx for slaves of pseudo terminals. This scheme has a number of problems. The GNU C library glibc 2.1 and later, however, supports the Unix98 naming standard: in order to acquire a pseudo terminal, a process opens /dev/ptmx; the number of the pseudo terminal is then made available to the process and the pseudo terminal slave can be accessed as /dev/pts/<number>. What was traditionally /dev/ttyp2 will then be /dev/pts/2, for example.

All modern Linux systems use the Unix98 ptys. Say Y unless you're on an embedded system and want to conserve memory.

Unix98 PTY support found in arch/um/Kconfig_char

The configuration item CONFIG_UNIX98_PTYS:

Help text

A pseudo terminal (PTY) is a software device consisting of two halves: a master and a slave. The slave device behaves identical to a physical terminal; the master device is used by a process to read data from and write data to the slave, thereby emulating a terminal. Typical programs for the master side are telnet servers and xterms.

Linux has traditionally used the BSD-like names /dev/ptyxx for masters and /dev/ttyxx for slaves of pseudo terminals. This scheme has a number of problems. The GNU C library glibc 2.1 and later, however, supports the Unix98 naming standard: in order to acquire a pseudo terminal, a process opens /dev/ptmx; the number of the pseudo terminal is then made available to the process and the pseudo terminal slave can be accessed as /dev/pts/<number>. What was traditionally /dev/ttyp2 will then be /dev/pts/2, for example.

All modern Linux systems use the Unix98 ptys. Say Y unless you're on an embedded system and want to conserve memory.

Unix98 PTY support found in drivers/char/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_UNIX98_PTYS:

Help text

A pseudo terminal (PTY) is a software device consisting of two halves: a master and a slave. The slave device behaves identical to a physical terminal; the master device is used by a process to read data from and write data to the slave, thereby emulating a terminal. Typical programs for the master side are telnet servers and xterms.

Linux has traditionally used the BSD-like names /dev/ptyxx for masters and /dev/ttyxx for slaves of pseudo terminals. This scheme has a number of problems. The GNU C library glibc 2.1 and later, however, supports the Unix98 naming standard: in order to acquire a pseudo terminal, a process opens /dev/ptmx; the number of the pseudo terminal is then made available to the process and the pseudo terminal slave can be accessed as /dev/pts/<number>. What was traditionally /dev/ttyp2 will then be /dev/pts/2, for example.

All modern Linux systems use the Unix98 ptys. Say Y unless you're on an embedded system and want to conserve memory.

Unix98 PTY support found in drivers/s390/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_UNIX98_PTYS:

Help text

A pseudo terminal (PTY) is a software device consisting of two halves: a master and a slave. The slave device behaves identical to a physical terminal; the master device is used by a process to read data from and write data to the slave, thereby emulating a terminal. Typical programs for the master side are telnet servers and xterms.

Linux has traditionally used the BSD-like names /dev/ptyxx for masters and /dev/ttyxx for slaves of pseudo terminals. This scheme has a number of problems. The GNU C library glibc 2.1 and later, however, supports the Unix98 naming standard: in order to acquire a pseudo terminal, a process opens /dev/ptmx; the number of the pseudo terminal is then made available to the process and the pseudo terminal slave can be accessed as /dev/pts/<number>. What was traditionally /dev/ttyp2 will then be /dev/pts/2, for example.

The entries in /dev/pts/ are created on the fly by a virtual file system; therefore, if you say Y here you should say Y to "/dev/pts file system for Unix98 PTYs" as well.

If you want to say Y here, you need to have the C library glibc 2.1 or later (equal to libc-6.1, check with "ls -l /lib/libc.so.*"). Read the instructions in Documentation/Changes pertaining to pseudo terminals. It's safe to say N.

Unix98 PTY support found in drivers/tty/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_UNIX98_PTYS:

Help text

A pseudo terminal (PTY) is a software device consisting of two halves: a master and a slave. The slave device behaves identical to a physical terminal; the master device is used by a process to read data from and write data to the slave, thereby emulating a terminal. Typical programs for the master side are telnet servers and xterms.

Linux has traditionally used the BSD-like names /dev/ptyxx for masters and /dev/ttyxx for slaves of pseudo terminals. This scheme has a number of problems. The GNU C library glibc 2.1 and later, however, supports the Unix98 naming standard: in order to acquire a pseudo terminal, a process opens /dev/ptmx; the number of the pseudo terminal is then made available to the process and the pseudo terminal slave can be accessed as /dev/pts/<number>. What was traditionally /dev/ttyp2 will then be /dev/pts/2, for example.

All modern Linux systems use the Unix98 ptys. Say Y unless you're on an embedded system and want to conserve memory.

Hardware

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