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CONFIG_X86_MCE: Machine Check Exception

General informations

The Linux kernel configuration item CONFIG_X86_MCE has multiple definitions:

found in arch/x86_64/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_X86_MCE:

Help text

(none)

Machine Check / overheating reporting found in arch/x86/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_X86_MCE:

Help text

Machine Check support allows the processor to notify the kernel if it detects a problem (e.g. overheating, data corruption). The action the kernel takes depends on the severity of the problem, ranging from warning messages to halting the machine.

Machine Check Exception found in arch/i386/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_X86_MCE:

Help text

Machine Check Exception support allows the processor to notify the kernel if it detects a problem (e.g. overheating, component failure). The action the kernel takes depends on the severity of the problem, ranging from a warning message on the console, to halting the machine. Your processor must be a Pentium or newer to support this - check the flags in /proc/cpuinfo for mce. Note that some older Pentium systems have a design flaw which leads to false MCE events - hence MCE is disabled on all P5 processors, unless explicitly enabled with "mce" as a boot argument. Similarly, if MCE is built in and creates a problem on some new non-standard machine, you can boot with "nomce" to disable it. MCE support simply ignores non-MCE processors like the 386 and 486, so nearly everyone can say Y here.

Machine Check Exception found in arch/x86/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_X86_MCE:

Help text

Machine Check Exception support allows the processor to notify the kernel if it detects a problem (e.g. overheating, component failure). The action the kernel takes depends on the severity of the problem, ranging from a warning message on the console, to halting the machine. Your processor must be a Pentium or newer to support this - check the flags in /proc/cpuinfo for mce. Note that some older Pentium systems have a design flaw which leads to false MCE events - hence MCE is disabled on all P5 processors, unless explicitly enabled with "mce" as a boot argument. Similarly, if MCE is built in and creates a problem on some new non-standard machine, you can boot with "nomce" to disable it. MCE support simply ignores non-MCE processors like the 386 and 486, so nearly everyone can say Y here.

Machine check support found in arch/x86_64/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_X86_MCE:

Help text

Include a machine check error handler to report hardware errors. This version will require the mcelog utility to decode some machine check error logs. See ftp://ftp.x86-64.org/pub/linux/tools/mcelog

Hardware

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