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CONFIG_BLK_DEV_RAM: RAM disk support

General informations

The Linux kernel configuration item CONFIG_BLK_DEV_RAM has multiple definitions:

RAM block device support found in drivers/block/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_BLK_DEV_RAM:

Help text

Saying Y here will allow you to use a portion of your RAM memory as a block device, so that you can make file systems on it, read and write to it and do all the other things that you can do with normal block devices (such as hard drives). It is usually used to load and store a copy of a minimal root file system off of a floppy into RAM during the initial install of Linux.

Note that the kernel command line option "ramdisk=XX" is now obsolete. For details, read Documentation/blockdev/ramdisk.txt.

To compile this driver as a module, choose M here: the module will be called brd. An alias "rd" has been defined for historical reasons.

Most normal users won't need the RAM disk functionality, and can thus say N here.

RAM disk support found in arch/ia64/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_BLK_DEV_RAM:

Help text

(none)

RAM disk support found in arch/sparc/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_BLK_DEV_RAM:

Help text

Saying Y here will allow you to use a portion of your RAM memory as a block device, so that you can make file systems on it, read and write to it and do all the other things that you can do with normal block devices (such as hard drives). It is usually used to load and store a copy of a minimal root file system off of a floppy into RAM during the initial install of Linux.

Note that the kernel command line option "ramdisk=XX" is now obsolete. For details, read Documentation/ramdisk.txt.

To compile this driver as a module, choose M here: the module will be called rd.

Most normal users won't need the RAM disk functionality, and can thus say N here.

RAM disk support found in arch/sparc64/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_BLK_DEV_RAM:

Help text

Saying Y here will allow you to use a portion of your RAM memory as a block device, so that you can make file systems on it, read and write to it and do all the other things that you can do with normal block devices (such as hard drives). It is usually used to load and store a copy of a minimal root file system off of a floppy into RAM during the initial install of Linux.

Note that the kernel command line option "ramdisk=XX" is now obsolete. For details, read Documentation/ramdisk.txt.

To compile this driver as a module, choose M here: the module will be called rd.

Most normal users won't need the RAM disk functionality, and can thus say N here.

RAM disk support found in arch/um/Kconfig_block

The configuration item CONFIG_BLK_DEV_RAM:

Help text

(none)

RAM disk support found in drivers/block/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_BLK_DEV_RAM:

Help text

Saying Y here will allow you to use a portion of your RAM memory as a block device, so that you can make file systems on it, read and write to it and do all the other things that you can do with normal block devices (such as hard drives). It is usually used to load and store a copy of a minimal root file system off of a floppy into RAM during the initial install of Linux.

Note that the kernel command line option "ramdisk=XX" is now obsolete. For details, read Documentation/ramdisk.txt.

To compile this driver as a module, choose M here: the module will be called rd.

Most normal users won't need the RAM disk functionality, and can thus say N here.

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