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CONFIG_NFS_FS: NFS client support

General informations

The Linux kernel configuration item CONFIG_NFS_FS has multiple definitions:

NFS client support found in fs/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_NFS_FS:

Help text

Choose Y here if you want to access files residing on other computers using Sun's Network File System protocol. To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the module will be called nfs.

To mount file systems exported by NFS servers, you also need to install the user space mount.nfs command which can be found in the Linux nfs-utils package, available from http://linux-nfs.org/. Information about using the mount command is available in the mount(8) man page. More detail about the Linux NFS client implementation is available via the nfs(5) man page.

Below you can choose which versions of the NFS protocol are available in the kernel to mount NFS servers. Support for NFS version 2 (RFC 1094) is always available when NFS_FS is selected.

To configure a system which mounts its root file system via NFS at boot time, say Y here, select "Kernel level IP autoconfiguration" in the NETWORK menu, and select "Root file system on NFS" below. You cannot compile this file system as a module in this case.

If unsure, say N.

NFS client support found in fs/nfs/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_NFS_FS:

Help text

Choose Y here if you want to access files residing on other computers using Sun's Network File System protocol. To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the module will be called nfs.

To mount file systems exported by NFS servers, you also need to install the user space mount.nfs command which can be found in the Linux nfs-utils package, available from http://linux-nfs.org/. Information about using the mount command is available in the mount(8) man page. More detail about the Linux NFS client implementation is available via the nfs(5) man page.

Below you can choose which versions of the NFS protocol are available in the kernel to mount NFS servers. Support for NFS version 2 (RFC 1094) is always available when NFS_FS is selected.

To configure a system which mounts its root file system via NFS at boot time, say Y here, select "Kernel level IP autoconfiguration" in the NETWORK menu, and select "Root file system on NFS" below. You cannot compile this file system as a module in this case.

If unsure, say N.

NFS file system support found in fs/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_NFS_FS:

Help text

If you are connected to some other (usually local) Unix computer (using SLIP, PLIP, PPP or Ethernet) and want to mount files residing on that computer (the NFS server) using the Network File Sharing protocol, say Y. "Mounting files" means that the client can access the files with usual UNIX commands as if they were sitting on the client's hard disk. For this to work, the server must run the programs nfsd and mountd (but does not need to have NFS file system support enabled in its kernel). NFS is explained in the Network Administrator's Guide, available from http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#guide, on its man page: "man nfs", and in the NFS-HOWTO.

A superior but less widely used alternative to NFS is provided by the Coda file system; see "Coda file system support" below.

If you say Y here, you should have said Y to TCP/IP networking also. This option would enlarge your kernel by about 27 KB.

To compile this file system support as a module, choose M here: the module will be called nfs.

If you are configuring a diskless machine which will mount its root file system over NFS at boot time, say Y here and to "Kernel level IP autoconfiguration" above and to "Root file system on NFS" below. You cannot compile this driver as a module in this case. There are two packages designed for booting diskless machines over the net: netboot, available from http://ftp1.sourceforge.net/netboot/, and Etherboot, available from http://ftp1.sourceforge.net/etherboot/.

If you don't know what all this is about, say N.

Hardware

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