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CONFIG_USB_ETH: Ethernet Gadget

General informations

The Linux kernel configuration item CONFIG_USB_ETH has multiple definitions:

Ethernet Gadget (with CDC Ethernet support) found in drivers/usb/gadget/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_USB_ETH:

Help text

This driver implements Ethernet style communication, in one of several ways:

- The "Communication Device Class" (CDC) Ethernet Control Model. That protocol is often avoided with pure Ethernet adapters, in favor of simpler vendor-specific hardware, but is widely supported by firmware for smart network devices.

- On hardware can't implement that protocol, a simple CDC subset is used, placing fewer demands on USB.

- CDC Ethernet Emulation Model (EEM) is a newer standard that has a simpler interface that can be used by more USB hardware.

RNDIS support is an additional option, more demanding than than subset.

Within the USB device, this gadget driver exposes a network device "usbX", where X depends on what other networking devices you have. Treat it like a two-node Ethernet link: host, and gadget.

The Linux-USB host-side "usbnet" driver interoperates with this driver, so that deep I/O queues can be supported. On 2.4 kernels, use "CDCEther" instead, if you're using the CDC option. That CDC mode should also interoperate with standard CDC Ethernet class drivers on other host operating systems.

Say "y" to link the driver statically, or "m" to build a dynamically linked module called "g_ether".

Ethernet Gadget (with CDC Ethernet support) found in drivers/usb/gadget/legacy/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_USB_ETH:

Help text

This driver implements Ethernet style communication, in one of several ways:

- The "Communication Device Class" (CDC) Ethernet Control Model. That protocol is often avoided with pure Ethernet adapters, in favor of simpler vendor-specific hardware, but is widely supported by firmware for smart network devices.

- On hardware can't implement that protocol, a simple CDC subset is used, placing fewer demands on USB.

- CDC Ethernet Emulation Model (EEM) is a newer standard that has a simpler interface that can be used by more USB hardware.

RNDIS support is an additional option, more demanding than than subset.

Within the USB device, this gadget driver exposes a network device "usbX", where X depends on what other networking devices you have. Treat it like a two-node Ethernet link: host, and gadget.

The Linux-USB host-side "usbnet" driver interoperates with this driver, so that deep I/O queues can be supported. On 2.4 kernels, use "CDCEther" instead, if you're using the CDC option. That CDC mode should also interoperate with standard CDC Ethernet class drivers on other host operating systems.

Say "y" to link the driver statically, or "m" to build a dynamically linked module called "g_ether".

Ethernet Gadget found in drivers/usb/gadget/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_USB_ETH:

Help text

This driver implements Ethernet style communication, in either of two ways:

- The "Communication Device Class" (CDC) Ethernet Control Model. That protocol is often avoided with pure Ethernet adapters, in favor of simpler vendor-specific hardware, but is widely supported by firmware for smart network devices.

- On hardware can't implement that protocol, a simple CDC subset is used, placing fewer demands on USB.

RNDIS support is a third option, more demanding than that subset.

Within the USB device, this gadget driver exposes a network device "usbX", where X depends on what other networking devices you have. Treat it like a two-node Ethernet link: host, and gadget.

The Linux-USB host-side "usbnet" driver interoperates with this driver, so that deep I/O queues can be supported. On 2.4 kernels, use "CDCEther" instead, if you're using the CDC option. That CDC mode should also interoperate with standard CDC Ethernet class drivers on other host operating systems.

Say "y" to link the driver statically, or "m" to build a dynamically linked module called "g_ether".

Hardware

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