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CONFIG_VT: Virtual terminal

General informations

The Linux kernel configuration item CONFIG_VT has multiple definitions:

found in arch/sparc/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_VT:

Help text

If you say Y here, you will get support for terminal devices with display and keyboard devices. These are called "virtual" because you can run several virtual terminals (also called virtual consoles) on one physical terminal. This is rather useful, for example one virtual terminal can collect system messages and warnings, another one can be used for a text-mode user session, and a third could run an X session, all in parallel. Switching between virtual terminals is done with certain key combinations, usually Alt-<function key>.

The setterm command ("man setterm") can be used to change the properties (such as colors or beeping) of a virtual terminal. The man page console_codes(4) ("man console_codes") contains the special character sequences that can be used to change those properties directly. The fonts used on virtual terminals can be changed with the setfont ("man setfont") command and the key bindings are defined with the loadkeys ("man loadkeys") command.

You need at least one virtual terminal device in order to make use of your keyboard and monitor. Therefore, only people configuring an embedded system would want to say N here in order to save some memory; the only way to log into such a system is then via a serial or network connection.

If unsure, say Y, or else you won't be able to do much with your new shiny Linux system :-)

Virtual terminal found in arch/h8300/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_VT:

Help text

If you say Y here, you will get support for terminal devices with display and keyboard devices. These are called "virtual" because you can run several virtual terminals (also called virtual consoles) on one physical terminal. This is rather useful, for example one virtual terminal can collect system messages and warnings, another one can be used for a text-mode user session, and a third could run an X session, all in parallel. Switching between virtual terminals is done with certain key combinations, usually Alt-<function key>.

The setterm command ("man setterm") can be used to change the properties (such as colors or beeping) of a virtual terminal. The man page console_codes(4) ("man console_codes") contains the special character sequences that can be used to change those properties directly. The fonts used on virtual terminals can be changed with the setfont ("man setfont") command and the key bindings are defined with the loadkeys ("man loadkeys") command.

You need at least one virtual terminal device in order to make use of your keyboard and monitor. Therefore, only people configuring an embedded system would want to say N here in order to save some memory; the only way to log into such a system is then via a serial or network connection.

If unsure, say Y, or else you won't be able to do much with your new shiny Linux system :-)

Virtual terminal found in arch/m68k/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_VT:

Help text

If you say Y here, you will get support for terminal devices with display and keyboard devices. These are called "virtual" because you can run several virtual terminals (also called virtual consoles) on one physical terminal. This is rather useful, for example one virtual terminal can collect system messages and warnings, another one can be used for a text-mode user session, and a third could run an X session, all in parallel. Switching between virtual terminals is done with certain key combinations, usually Alt-<function key>.

The setterm command ("man setterm") can be used to change the properties (such as colors or beeping) of a virtual terminal. The man page console_codes(4) ("man console_codes") contains the special character sequences that can be used to change those properties directly. The fonts used on virtual terminals can be changed with the setfont ("man setfont") command and the key bindings are defined with the loadkeys ("man loadkeys") command.

You need at least one virtual terminal device in order to make use of your keyboard and monitor. Therefore, only people configuring an embedded system would want to say N here in order to save some memory; the only way to log into such a system is then via a serial or network connection.

If unsure, say Y, or else you won't be able to do much with your new shiny Linux system :-)

Virtual terminal found in arch/sh/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_VT:

Help text

If you say Y here, you will get support for terminal devices with display and keyboard devices. These are called "virtual" because you can run several virtual terminals (also called virtual consoles) on one physical terminal. This is rather useful, for example one virtual terminal can collect system messages and warnings, another one can be used for a text-mode user session, and a third could run an X session, all in parallel. Switching between virtual terminals is done with certain key combinations, usually Alt-<function key>.

The setterm command ("man setterm") can be used to change the properties (such as colors or beeping) of a virtual terminal. The man page console_codes(4) ("man console_codes") contains the special character sequences that can be used to change those properties directly. The fonts used on virtual terminals can be changed with the setfont ("man setfont") command and the key bindings are defined with the loadkeys ("man loadkeys") command.

You need at least one virtual terminal device in order to make use of your keyboard and monitor. Therefore, only people configuring an embedded system would want to say N here in order to save some memory; the only way to log into such a system is then via a serial or network connection.

If unsure, say Y, or else you won't be able to do much with your new shiny Linux system :-)

Virtual terminal found in arch/sparc64/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_VT:

Help text

If you say Y here, you will get support for terminal devices with display and keyboard devices. These are called "virtual" because you can run several virtual terminals (also called virtual consoles) on one physical terminal. This is rather useful, for example one virtual terminal can collect system messages and warnings, another one can be used for a text-mode user session, and a third could run an X session, all in parallel. Switching between virtual terminals is done with certain key combinations, usually Alt-<function key>.

The setterm command ("man setterm") can be used to change the properties (such as colors or beeping) of a virtual terminal. The man page console_codes(4) ("man console_codes") contains the special character sequences that can be used to change those properties directly. The fonts used on virtual terminals can be changed with the setfont ("man setfont") command and the key bindings are defined with the loadkeys ("man loadkeys") command.

You need at least one virtual terminal device in order to make use of your keyboard and monitor. Therefore, only people configuring an embedded system would want to say N here in order to save some memory; the only way to log into such a system is then via a serial or network connection.

If unsure, say Y, or else you won't be able to do much with your new shiny Linux system :-)

Virtual terminal found in drivers/char/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_VT:

Help text

If you say Y here, you will get support for terminal devices with display and keyboard devices. These are called "virtual" because you can run several virtual terminals (also called virtual consoles) on one physical terminal. This is rather useful, for example one virtual terminal can collect system messages and warnings, another one can be used for a text-mode user session, and a third could run an X session, all in parallel. Switching between virtual terminals is done with certain key combinations, usually Alt-<function key>.

The setterm command ("man setterm") can be used to change the properties (such as colors or beeping) of a virtual terminal. The man page console_codes(4) ("man console_codes") contains the special character sequences that can be used to change those properties directly. The fonts used on virtual terminals can be changed with the setfont ("man setfont") command and the key bindings are defined with the loadkeys ("man loadkeys") command.

You need at least one virtual terminal device in order to make use of your keyboard and monitor. Therefore, only people configuring an embedded system would want to say N here in order to save some memory; the only way to log into such a system is then via a serial or network connection.

If unsure, say Y, or else you won't be able to do much with your new shiny Linux system :-)

Virtual terminal found in drivers/tty/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_VT:

Help text

If you say Y here, you will get support for terminal devices with display and keyboard devices. These are called "virtual" because you can run several virtual terminals (also called virtual consoles) on one physical terminal. This is rather useful, for example one virtual terminal can collect system messages and warnings, another one can be used for a text-mode user session, and a third could run an X session, all in parallel. Switching between virtual terminals is done with certain key combinations, usually Alt-<function key>.

The setterm command ("man setterm") can be used to change the properties (such as colors or beeping) of a virtual terminal. The man page console_codes(4) ("man console_codes") contains the special character sequences that can be used to change those properties directly. The fonts used on virtual terminals can be changed with the setfont ("man setfont") command and the key bindings are defined with the loadkeys ("man loadkeys") command.

You need at least one virtual terminal device in order to make use of your keyboard and monitor. Therefore, only people configuring an embedded system would want to say N here in order to save some memory; the only way to log into such a system is then via a serial or network connection.

If unsure, say Y, or else you won't be able to do much with your new shiny Linux system :-)

Hardware

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