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CONFIG_WATCHDOG: Watchdog Timer Support

General informations

The Linux kernel configuration item CONFIG_WATCHDOG has multiple definitions:

Watchdog Timer Support found in arch/m68k/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_WATCHDOG:

Help text

If you say Y here (and to one of the following options) and create a character special file /dev/watchdog with major number 10 and minor number 130 using mknod ("man mknod"), you will get a watchdog, i.e.: subsequently opening the file and then failing to write to it for longer than 1 minute will result in rebooting the machine. This could be useful for a networked machine that needs to come back online as fast as possible after a lock-up. There's both a watchdog implementation entirely in software (which can sometimes fail to reboot the machine) and a driver for hardware watchdog boards, which are more robust and can also keep track of the temperature inside your computer. For details, read Documentation/watchdog/watchdog.txt in the kernel source.

The watchdog is usually used together with the watchdog daemon which is available from <ftp://ibiblio.org/pub/Linux/system/daemons/watchdog/>. This daemon can also monitor NFS connections and can reboot the machine when the process table is full.

If unsure, say N.

Watchdog Timer Support found in arch/sh/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_WATCHDOG:

Help text

If you say Y here (and to one of the following options) and create a character special file /dev/watchdog with major number 10 and minor number 130 using mknod ("man mknod"), you will get a watchdog, i.e.: subsequently opening the file and then failing to write to it for longer than 1 minute will result in rebooting the machine. This could be useful for a networked machine that needs to come back online as fast as possible after a lock-up. There's both a watchdog implementation entirely in software (which can sometimes fail to reboot the machine) and a driver for hardware watchdog boards, which are more robust and can also keep track of the temperature inside your computer. For details, read Documentation/watchdog/watchdog.txt in the kernel source.

The watchdog is usually used together with the watchdog daemon which is available from <ftp://ibiblio.org/pub/Linux/system/daemons/watchdog/>. This daemon can also monitor NFS connections and can reboot the machine when the process table is full.

If unsure, say N.

Watchdog Timer Support found in arch/um/Kconfig.char

The configuration item CONFIG_WATCHDOG:

Help text

(none)

Watchdog Timer Support found in arch/um/Kconfig_char

The configuration item CONFIG_WATCHDOG:

Help text

(none)

Watchdog Timer Support found in drivers/char/watchdog/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_WATCHDOG:

Help text

If you say Y here (and to one of the following options) and create a character special file /dev/watchdog with major number 10 and minor number 130 using mknod ("man mknod"), you will get a watchdog, i.e.: subsequently opening the file and then failing to write to it for longer than 1 minute will result in rebooting the machine. This could be useful for a networked machine that needs to come back on-line as fast as possible after a lock-up. There's both a watchdog implementation entirely in software (which can sometimes fail to reboot the machine) and a driver for hardware watchdog boards, which are more robust and can also keep track of the temperature inside your computer. For details, read Documentation/watchdog/watchdog.txt in the kernel source.

The watchdog is usually used together with the watchdog daemon which is available from <ftp://ibiblio.org/pub/Linux/system/daemons/watchdog/>. This daemon can also monitor NFS connections and can reboot the machine when the process table is full.

If unsure, say N.

Watchdog Timer Support found in drivers/watchdog/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_WATCHDOG:

Help text

If you say Y here (and to one of the following options) and create a character special file /dev/watchdog with major number 10 and minor number 130 using mknod ("man mknod"), you will get a watchdog, i.e.: subsequently opening the file and then failing to write to it for longer than 1 minute will result in rebooting the machine. This could be useful for a networked machine that needs to come back on-line as fast as possible after a lock-up. There's both a watchdog implementation entirely in software (which can sometimes fail to reboot the machine) and a driver for hardware watchdog boards, which are more robust and can also keep track of the temperature inside your computer. For details, read Documentation/watchdog/watchdog-api.txt in the kernel source.

The watchdog is usually used together with the watchdog daemon which is available from <ftp://ibiblio.org/pub/Linux/system/daemons/watchdog/>. This daemon can also monitor NFS connections and can reboot the machine when the process table is full.

If unsure, say N.

Hardware

PCI

Numeric ID (from LKDDb) and names (from pci.ids) of recognized devices:

USB

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