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CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF: Kernel support for ELF binaries

General informations

The Linux kernel configuration item CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF has multiple definitions:

Kernel support for ELF binaries found in fs/Kconfig.binfmt

The configuration item CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF:

Help text

ELF (Executable and Linkable Format) is a format for libraries and executables used across different architectures and operating systems. Saying Y here will enable your kernel to run ELF binaries and enlarge it by about 13 KB. ELF support under Linux has now all but replaced the traditional Linux a.out formats (QMAGIC and ZMAGIC) because it is portable (this does *not* mean that you will be able to run executables from different architectures or operating systems however) and makes building run-time libraries very easy. Many new executables are distributed solely in ELF format. You definitely want to say Y here.

Information about ELF is contained in the ELF HOWTO available from http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto.

If you find that after upgrading from Linux kernel 1.2 and saying Y here, you still can't run any ELF binaries (they just crash), then you'll have to install the newest ELF runtime libraries, including ld.so (check the file Documentation/Changes for location and latest version).

found in arch/arc/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF:

Help text

(none)

Kernel support for ELF binaries found in fs/Kconfig.binfmt

The configuration item CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF:

Help text

ELF (Executable and Linkable Format) is a format for libraries and executables used across different architectures and operating systems. Saying Y here will enable your kernel to run ELF binaries and enlarge it by about 13 KB. ELF support under Linux has now all but replaced the traditional Linux a.out formats (QMAGIC and ZMAGIC) because it is portable (this does *not* mean that you will be able to run executables from different architectures or operating systems however) and makes building run-time libraries very easy. Many new executables are distributed solely in ELF format. You definitely want to say Y here.

Information about ELF is contained in the ELF HOWTO available from http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto.

If you find that after upgrading from Linux kernel 1.2 and saying Y here, you still can't run any ELF binaries (they just crash), then you'll have to install the newest ELF runtime libraries, including ld.so (check the file Documentation/Changes for location and latest version).

If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want), say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. The module will be called binfmt_elf. Saying M or N here is dangerous because some crucial programs on your system might be in ELF format.

Kernel support for ELF binaries found in arch/arm26/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF:

Help text

ELF (Executable and Linkable Format) is a format for libraries and executables used across different architectures and operating systems. Saying Y here will enable your kernel to run ELF binaries and enlarge it by about 13 KB. ELF support under Linux has now all but replaced the traditional Linux a.out formats (QMAGIC and ZMAGIC) because it is portable (this does *not* mean that you will be able to run executables from different architectures or operating systems however) and makes building run-time libraries very easy. Many new executables are distributed solely in ELF format. You definitely want to say Y here.

Information about ELF is contained in the ELF HOWTO available from http://www.linuxdoc.org/docs.html#howto.

If you find that after upgrading from Linux kernel 1.2 and saying Y here, you still can't run any ELF binaries (they just crash), then you'll have to install the newest ELF runtime libraries, including ld.so (check the file Documentation/Changes for location and latest version).

If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want), say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. The module will be called binfmt_elf. Saying M or N here is dangerous because some crucial programs on your system might be in ELF format.

Kernel support for 64-bit ELF binaries found in arch/sparc64/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF:

Help text

ELF (Executable and Linkable Format) is a format for libraries and executables used across different architectures and operating systems. Saying Y here will enable your kernel to run ELF binaries and enlarge it by about 13 KB. ELF support under Linux has now all but replaced the traditional Linux a.out formats (QMAGIC and ZMAGIC) because it is portable (this does *not* mean that you will be able to run executables from different architectures or operating systems however) and makes building run-time libraries very easy. Many new executables are distributed solely in ELF format. You definitely want to say Y here.

Information about ELF is contained in the ELF HOWTO available from http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto.

If you find that after upgrading from Linux kernel 1.2 and saying Y here, you still can't run any ELF binaries (they just crash), then you'll have to install the newest ELF runtime libraries, including ld.so (check the file Documentation/Changes for location and latest version).

If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want), say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. The module will be called binfmt_elf. Saying M or N here is dangerous because some crucial programs on your system might be in ELF format.

Kernel support for 64-bit ELF binaries found in arch/ppc64/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF:

Help text

ELF (Executable and Linkable Format) is a format for libraries and executables used across different architectures and operating systems.

Kernel support for 64-bit ELF binaries found in arch/mips64/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF:

Help text

ELF (Executable and Linkable Format) is a format for libraries and executables used across different architectures and operating systems. Saying Y here will enable your kernel to run ELF binaries and enlarge it by about 13 KB. ELF support under Linux has now all but replaced the traditional Linux a.out formats (QMAGIC and ZMAGIC) because it is portable (this does *not* mean that you will be able to run executables from different architectures or operating systems however) and makes building run-time libraries very easy. Many new executables are distributed solely in ELF format. You definitely want to say Y here.

Information about ELF is contained in the ELF HOWTO available from http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto.

If you find that after upgrading from Linux kernel 1.2 and saying Y here, you still can't run any ELF binaries (they just crash), then you'll have to install the newest ELF runtime libraries, including ld.so (check the file Documentation/Changes for location and latest version).

If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want), say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. The module will be called binfmt_elf. Saying M or N here is dangerous because some crucial programs on your system might be in ELF format.

Kernel support for ELF binaries found in arch/um/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF:

Help text

(none)

Kernel support for ELF binaries found in arch/sparc/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF:

Help text

ELF (Executable and Linkable Format) is a format for libraries and executables used across different architectures and operating systems. Saying Y here will enable your kernel to run ELF binaries and enlarge it by about 13 KB. ELF support under Linux has now all but replaced the traditional Linux a.out formats (QMAGIC and ZMAGIC) because it is portable (this does *not* mean that you will be able to run executables from different architectures or operating systems however) and makes building run-time libraries very easy. Many new executables are distributed solely in ELF format. You definitely want to say Y here.

Information about ELF is contained in the ELF HOWTO available from http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto.

If you find that after upgrading from Linux kernel 1.2 and saying Y here, you still can't run any ELF binaries (they just crash), then you'll have to install the newest ELF runtime libraries, including ld.so (check the file Documentation/Changes for location and latest version).

If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want), say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. The module will be called binfmt_elf. Saying M or N here is dangerous because some crucial programs on your system might be in ELF format.

Kernel support for ELF binaries found in arch/sh/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF:

Help text

ELF (Executable and Linkable Format) is a format for libraries and executables used across different architectures and operating systems. Saying Y here will enable your kernel to run ELF binaries and enlarge it by about 13 KB. ELF support under Linux has now all but replaced the traditional Linux a.out formats (QMAGIC and ZMAGIC) because it is portable (this does *not* mean that you will be able to run executables from different architectures or operating systems however) and makes building run-time libraries very easy. Many new executables are distributed solely in ELF format. You definitely want to say Y here.

Information about ELF is contained in the ELF HOWTO available from http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto.

If you find that after upgrading from Linux kernel 1.2 and saying Y here, you still can't run any ELF binaries (they just crash), then you'll have to install the newest ELF runtime libraries, including ld.so (check the file Documentation/Changes for location and latest version).

If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want), say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. The module will be called binfmt_elf. Saying M or N here is dangerous because some crucial programs on your system might be in ELF format.

Kernel support for ELF binaries found in arch/s390/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF:

Help text

ELF (Executable and Linkable Format) is a format for libraries and executables used across different architectures and operating systems. Saying Y here will enable your kernel to run ELF binaries and enlarge it by about 13 KB. ELF support under Linux has now all but replaced the traditional Linux a.out formats (QMAGIC and ZMAGIC) because it is portable (this does *not* mean that you will be able to run executables from different architectures or operating systems however) and makes building run-time libraries very easy. Many new executables are distributed solely in ELF format. You definitely want to say Y here.

Information about ELF is contained in the ELF HOWTO available from http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto.

If you find that after upgrading from Linux kernel 1.2 and saying Y here, you still can't run any ELF binaries (they just crash), then you'll have to install the newest ELF runtime libraries, including ld.so (check the file Documentation/Changes for location and latest version).

If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want), say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. The module will be called binfmt_elf. Saying M or N here is dangerous because some crucial programs on your system might be in ELF format.

Kernel support for ELF binaries found in arch/parisc/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF:

Help text

ELF (Executable and Linkable Format) is a format for libraries and executables used across different architectures and operating systems. Saying Y here will enable your kernel to run ELF binaries and enlarge it by about 13 KB. ELF support under Linux has now all but replaced the traditional Linux a.out formats (QMAGIC and ZMAGIC) because it is portable (this does *not* mean that you will be able to run executables from different architectures or operating systems however) and makes building run-time libraries very easy. Many new executables are distributed solely in ELF format. You definitely want to say Y here.

Information about ELF is contained in the ELF HOWTO available from http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto.

If you find that after upgrading from Linux kernel 1.2 and saying Y here, you still can't run any ELF binaries (they just crash), then you'll have to install the newest ELF runtime libraries, including ld.so (check the file Documentation/Changes for location and latest version).

If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want), say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. The module will be called binfmt_elf. Saying M or N here is dangerous because some crucial programs on your system might be in ELF format.

Kernel support for ELF binaries found in arch/m68k/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF:

Help text

ELF (Executable and Linkable Format) is a format for libraries and executables used across different architectures and operating systems. Saying Y here will enable your kernel to run ELF binaries and enlarge it by about 13 KB. ELF support under Linux has now all but replaced the traditional Linux a.out formats (QMAGIC and ZMAGIC) because it is portable (this does *not* mean that you will be able to run executables from different architectures or operating systems however) and makes building run-time libraries very easy. Many new executables are distributed solely in ELF format. You definitely want to say Y here.

Information about ELF is contained in the ELF HOWTO available from http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto.

If you find that after upgrading from Linux kernel 1.2 and saying Y here, you still can't run any ELF binaries (they just crash), then you'll have to install the newest ELF runtime libraries, including ld.so (check the file Documentation/Changes for location and latest version).

If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want), say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. The module will be called binfmt_elf. Saying M or N here is dangerous because some crucial programs on your system might be in ELF format.

Kernel support for ELF binaries found in arch/ia64/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF:

Help text

ELF (Executable and Linkable Format) is a format for libraries and executables used across different architectures and operating systems. Saying Y here will enable your kernel to run ELF binaries.

Information about ELF is contained in the ELF HOWTO available from http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto.

Kernel support for ELF binaries found in arch/i386/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF:

Help text

ELF (Executable and Linkable Format) is a format for libraries and executables used across different architectures and operating systems. Saying Y here will enable your kernel to run ELF binaries and enlarge it by about 13 KB. ELF support under Linux has now all but replaced the traditional Linux a.out formats (QMAGIC and ZMAGIC) because it is portable (this does *not* mean that you will be able to run executables from different architectures or operating systems however) and makes building run-time libraries very easy. Many new executables are distributed solely in ELF format. You definitely want to say Y here.

Information about ELF is contained in the ELF HOWTO available from http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto.

If you find that after upgrading from Linux kernel 1.2 and saying Y here, you still can't run any ELF binaries (they just crash), then you'll have to install the newest ELF runtime libraries, including ld.so (check the file Documentation/Changes for location and latest version).

If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want), say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. The module will be called binfmt_elf. Saying M or N here is dangerous because some crucial programs on your system might be in ELF format.

Kernel support for ELF binaries found in arch/cris/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF:

Help text

ELF (Executable and Linkable Format) is a format for libraries and executables used across different architectures and operating systems. Saying Y here will enable your kernel to run ELF binaries and enlarge it by about 13 KB. ELF support under Linux has now all but replaced the traditional Linux a.out formats (QMAGIC and ZMAGIC) because it is portable (this does *not* mean that you will be able to run executables from different architectures or operating systems however) and makes building run-time libraries very easy. Many new executables are distributed solely in ELF format. You definitely want to say Y here.

Information about ELF is contained in the ELF HOWTO available from http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto.

If you find that after upgrading from Linux kernel 1.2 and saying Y here, you still can't run any ELF binaries (they just crash), then you'll have to install the newest ELF runtime libraries, including ld.so (check the file Documentation/Changes for location and latest version).

If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want), say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. The module will be called binfmt_elf. Saying M or N here is dangerous because some crucial programs on your system might be in ELF format.

Kernel support for ELF binaries found in arch/arm/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF:

Help text

ELF (Executable and Linkable Format) is a format for libraries and executables used across different architectures and operating systems. Saying Y here will enable your kernel to run ELF binaries and enlarge it by about 13 KB. ELF support under Linux has now all but replaced the traditional Linux a.out formats (QMAGIC and ZMAGIC) because it is portable (this does *not* mean that you will be able to run executables from different architectures or operating systems however) and makes building run-time libraries very easy. Many new executables are distributed solely in ELF format. You definitely want to say Y here.

Information about ELF is contained in the ELF HOWTO available from http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto.

If you find that after upgrading from Linux kernel 1.2 and saying Y here, you still can't run any ELF binaries (they just crash), then you'll have to install the newest ELF runtime libraries, including ld.so (check the file Documentation/Changes for location and latest version).

If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want), say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. The module will be called binfmt_elf. Saying M or N here is dangerous because some crucial programs on your system might be in ELF format.

Kernel support for ELF binaries found in arch/alpha/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF:

Help text

ELF (Executable and Linkable Format) is a format for libraries and executables used across different architectures and operating systems. Saying Y here will enable your kernel to run ELF binaries and enlarge it by about 13 KB. ELF support under Linux has now all but replaced the traditional Linux a.out formats (QMAGIC and ZMAGIC) because it is portable (this does *not* mean that you will be able to run executables from different architectures or operating systems however) and makes building run-time libraries very easy. Many new executables are distributed solely in ELF format. You definitely want to say Y here.

Information about ELF is contained in the ELF HOWTO available from http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto.

If you find that after upgrading from Linux kernel 1.2 and saying Y here, you still can't run any ELF binaries (they just crash), then you'll have to install the newest ELF runtime libraries, including ld.so (check the file Documentation/Changes for location and latest version).

If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want), say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. The module will be called binfmt_elf. Saying M or N here is dangerous because some crucial programs on your system might be in ELF format.

found in arch/x86_64/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF:

Help text

(none)

found in arch/ppc/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF:

Help text

ELF (Executable and Linkable Format) is a format for libraries and executables used across different architectures and operating systems.

found in arch/mips/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF:

Help text

ELF (Executable and Linkable Format) is a format for libraries and executables used across different architectures and operating systems. Saying Y here will enable your kernel to run ELF binaries and enlarge it by about 13 KB. ELF support under Linux has now all but replaced the traditional Linux a.out formats (QMAGIC and ZMAGIC) because it is portable (this does *not* mean that you will be able to run executables from different architectures or operating systems however) and makes building run-time libraries very easy. Many new executables are distributed solely in ELF format. You definitely want to say Y here.

Information about ELF is contained in the ELF HOWTO available from http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto.

If you find that after upgrading from Linux kernel 1.2 and saying Y here, you still can't run any ELF binaries (they just crash), then you'll have to install the newest ELF runtime libraries, including ld.so (check the file Documentation/Changes for location and latest version).

If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want), say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. The module will be called binfmt_elf. Saying M or N here is dangerous because some crucial programs on your system might be in ELF format.

Kernel support for ELF binaries found in arch/s390x/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF:

Help text

ELF (Executable and Linkable Format) is a format for libraries and executables used across different architectures and operating systems. Saying Y here will enable your kernel to run ELF binaries and enlarge it by about 13 KB. ELF support under Linux has now all but replaced the traditional Linux a.out formats (QMAGIC and ZMAGIC) because it is portable (this does *not* mean that you will be able to run executables from different architectures or operating systems however) and makes building run-time libraries very easy. Many new executables are distributed solely in ELF format. You definitely want to say Y here.

Information about ELF is contained in the ELF HOWTO available from http://www.linuxdoc.org/docs.html#howto.

If you find that after upgrading from Linux kernel 1.2 and saying Y here, you still can't run any ELF binaries (they just crash), then you'll have to install the newest ELF runtime libraries, including ld.so (check the file Documentation/Changes for location and latest version).

If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want), say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. The module will be called binfmt_elf. Saying M or N here is dangerous because some crucial programs on your system might be in ELF format.

Kernel support for ELF binaries found in arch/x86_64/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_BINFMT_ELF:

Help text

ELF (Executable and Linkable Format) is a format for libraries and executables used across different architectures and operating systems. Saying Y here will enable your kernel to run ELF binaries and enlarge it by about 13 KB. ELF support under Linux has now all but replaced the traditional Linux a.out formats (QMAGIC and ZMAGIC) because it is portable (this does *not* mean that you will be able to run executables from different architectures or operating systems however) and makes building run-time libraries very easy. Many new executables are distributed solely in ELF format. You definitely want to say Y here.

Information about ELF is contained in the ELF HOWTO available from http://www.tldp.org/docs.html#howto.

If you find that after upgrading from Linux kernel 1.2 and saying Y here, you still can't run any ELF binaries (they just crash), then you'll have to install the newest ELF runtime libraries, including ld.so (check the file Documentation/Changes for location and latest version).

If you want to compile this as a module ( = code which can be inserted in and removed from the running kernel whenever you want), say M here and read Documentation/modules.txt. The module will be called binfmt_elf. Saying M or N here is dangerous because some crucial programs on your system might be in ELF format.

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