Navigation: Linux Kernel Driver DataBase - web LKDDB: Main index - C index

CONFIG_CIFS: CIFS support (advanced network filesystem for Samba, Window and other CIFS compliant servers)

General informations

The Linux kernel configuration item CONFIG_CIFS has multiple definitions:

CIFS support (advanced network filesystem for Samba, Window and other CIFS compliant servers)(EXPERIMENTAL) found in fs/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_CIFS:

Help text

This is the client VFS module for the Common Internet File System (CIFS) protocol which is the successor to the Server Message Block (SMB) protocol, the native file sharing mechanism for most early PC operating systems. The CIFS protocol is fully supported by file servers such as Windows 2000 (including Windows 2003, NT 4 and Windows XP) as well by Samba (which provides excellent CIFS server support for Linux and many other operating systems). Currently you must use the smbfs client filesystem to access older SMB servers such as Windows 9x and OS/2.

The intent of the cifs module is to provide an advanced network file system client for mounting to CIFS compliant servers, including support for dfs (hierarchical name space), secure per-user session establishment, safe distributed caching (oplock), optional packet signing, Unicode and other internationalization improvements, and optional Winbind (nsswitch) integration. You do not need to enable cifs if running only a (Samba) server. It is possible to enable both smbfs and cifs (e.g. if you are using CIFS for accessing Windows 2003 and Samba 3 servers, and smbfs for accessing old servers). If you need to mount to Samba or Windows 2003 servers from this machine, say Y.

CIFS support (advanced network filesystem for Samba, Window and other CIFS compliant servers) found in fs/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_CIFS:

Help text

This is the client VFS module for the Common Internet File System (CIFS) protocol which is the successor to the Server Message Block (SMB) protocol, the native file sharing mechanism for most early PC operating systems. The CIFS protocol is fully supported by file servers such as Windows 2000 (including Windows 2003, NT 4 and Windows XP) as well by Samba (which provides excellent CIFS server support for Linux and many other operating systems). Limited support for OS/2 and Windows ME and similar servers is provided as well.

The intent of the cifs module is to provide an advanced network file system client for mounting to CIFS compliant servers, including support for dfs (hierarchical name space), secure per-user session establishment, safe distributed caching (oplock), optional packet signing, Unicode and other internationalization improvements. If you need to mount to Samba or Windows from this machine, say Y.

CIFS support (advanced network filesystem, SMBFS successor) found in fs/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_CIFS:

Help text

This is the client VFS module for the Common Internet File System (CIFS) protocol which is the successor to the Server Message Block (SMB) protocol, the native file sharing mechanism for most early PC operating systems. The CIFS protocol is fully supported by file servers such as Windows 2000 (including Windows 2003, NT 4 and Windows XP) as well by Samba (which provides excellent CIFS server support for Linux and many other operating systems). Limited support for OS/2 and Windows ME and similar servers is provided as well.

The cifs module provides an advanced network file system client for mounting to CIFS compliant servers. It includes support for DFS (hierarchical name space), secure per-user session establishment via Kerberos or NTLM or NTLMv2, safe distributed caching (oplock), optional packet signing, Unicode and other internationalization improvements. If you need to mount to Samba or Windows from this machine, say Y.

CIFS support (advanced network filesystem, SMBFS successor) found in fs/cifs/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_CIFS:

Help text

This is the client VFS module for the Common Internet File System (CIFS) protocol which is the successor to the Server Message Block (SMB) protocol, the native file sharing mechanism for most early PC operating systems. The CIFS protocol is fully supported by file servers such as Windows 2000 (including Windows 2003, Windows 2008, NT 4 and Windows XP) as well by Samba (which provides excellent CIFS server support for Linux and many other operating systems). Limited support for OS/2 and Windows ME and similar servers is provided as well.

The module also provides optional support for the followon protocols for CIFS including SMB3, which enables useful performance and security features (see the description of CIFS_SMB2).

The cifs module provides an advanced network file system client for mounting to CIFS compliant servers. It includes support for DFS (hierarchical name space), secure per-user session establishment via Kerberos or NTLM or NTLMv2, safe distributed caching (oplock), optional packet signing, Unicode and other internationalization improvements. If you need to mount to Samba or Windows from this machine, say Y.

SMB3 and CIFS support (advanced network filesystem) found in fs/cifs/Kconfig

The configuration item CONFIG_CIFS:

Help text

This is the client VFS module for the SMB3 family of NAS protocols, as well as for earlier dialects such as SMB2.1, SMB2 and the Common Internet File System (CIFS) protocol. CIFS was the successor to the original dialect, the Server Message Block (SMB) protocol, the native file sharing mechanism for most early PC operating systems.

The SMB3 protocol is supported by most modern operating systems and NAS appliances (e.g. Samba, Windows 8, Windows 2012, MacOS). The older CIFS protocol was included in Windows NT4, 2000 and XP (and later) as well by Samba (which provides excellent CIFS and SMB3 server support for Linux and many other operating systems). Limited support for OS/2 and Windows ME and similar very old servers is provided as well.

The cifs module provides an advanced network file system client for mounting to SMB3 (and CIFS) compliant servers. It includes support for DFS (hierarchical name space), secure per-user session establishment via Kerberos or NTLM or NTLMv2, safe distributed caching (oplock), optional packet signing, Unicode and other internationalization improvements.

In general, the default dialects, SMB3 and later, enable better performance, security and features, than would be possible with CIFS. Note that when mounting to Samba, due to the CIFS POSIX extensions, CIFS mounts can provide slightly better POSIX compatibility than SMB3 mounts. SMB2/SMB3 mount options are also slightly simpler (compared to CIFS) due to protocol improvements.

If you need to mount to Samba, Macs or Windows from this machine, say Y.

Hardware

LKDDb

Raw data from LKDDb:

Sources

This page is automaticly generated with free (libre, open) software lkddb(see lkddb-sources).

The data is retrived from:

Automatic links from Google (and ads)

Custom Search

Popular queries:

Navigation: Linux Kernel Driver DataBase - web LKDDB: main index - C index

Automatically generated (in year 2017) with gen-web-lkddb.py in lkddb-sources.